ILLUS: Treblinka, Samuel Willenber

Campo de exterminio de Treblinka
Polonia
Solución final.
Desde julio de 1942
870.000 asesinados.
Aktion 1005: la campaña nazi para destruir las evidencias y cerrar el campo (desde marzo hasta julio de 1943.
Destrucción total y se reconvirtió en una granja.
Comandantes Franz Stangl y Kurt Franz, sentenciados de por vida.

Samuel Willenber fue un superviviente del campo.

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Ilustración del campo de concentración.
Samuel Willenberg, 1923

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Otra recreación de Samuel Willenberg

Samuel Willenberg was born in Czestochowa in 1923. His father was a painter and teacher in the local Jewish middle school and his mother was Russian. The family moved to Warsaw shortly before the outbreak of World War II. In 1939 Willenberg volunteered for the Polish army and was wounded in fighting against the Soviets in the east of the country. In 1940 he moved to Opatow where he continued to teach privately. In 1942, in spite of possessing false documents identifying him as an Aryan, he was arrested and sent to the concentration camp at Treblinka along with the entire Jewish population of Opatow. Upon arriving at the camp, he claimed to be a brick mason and thus succeeded in avoiding death in a gas chamber. He participated in a prisoners’ revolt in August of 1943, during which he was able to escape and get back to Warsaw. With the outbreak of the Warsaw Uprising, he joined up with a unit of the Home Army (AK), and in September transferred to the PAL fighting organization. Following the fall of the uprising he received a series of medals: the Virtuti Militari 5th class, two Hearts of Valor, the Silver Cross of Merit and the PAL golden fighting badge. In 1950 he left Poland for Israel with his entire family. There, he worked for many years as the Chief Inspector of Measurements in the Ministry of Land Development. Upon retiring, he enrolled in the People’s University, where he studied painting, sculpture and art history. In 1994 he was once again granted Polish citizenship.

GRAPHICS: The Blitz, agosto 1940-mayo 1941

70 años de los ataques alemanes al Reino Unido.

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Carta de Hitler.
Julio de 1940

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Respuesta de Churchill

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El plan alemán.

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Manual nazi para atacar el Reino Unido.
1940

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Visto en War and Game.

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Visto en War and Game.

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Fase II: 24 de agosto-5 de septiembre de 1940

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Fase III: Ofensiva en septiembre de 1940

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Daily Sketch
16 page tabloid format newspaper replica of original Daily Sketch Newspaper produced on August 29th 1940
Includes stories on war-related events, pictures, black-out times and advertisements
Click on thumbnail for larger image
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7 de septiembre de 1940

The ‘Blitz’ on Britain’s cities had begun – London would endure 57 nights of bombing without respite. 43,000 civilians would be killed, half of them in London, and more than one million homes destroyed or damaged in London alone. Other cities that were to suffer included Belfast, Bristol, Birmingham, Cardiff, Coventry, Glasgow, Sheffield, Swansea, Liverpool Hull, Manchester, Portsmouth, Plymouth and Southampton.

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Portada de Life

23 de septiembre de 1940

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The Illustrated London News, octubre 1940

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Daily Mail
31 de diciembre de 1940

This edition of the Daily Mail had on its front page a photograph by Herbert Mason of the dome of St. Paul’s Cathedral showing through the smoke from the fires resulting from the severe raid on the City of the night of 29 December 1940. It was captioned as ‘War’s Greatest Picture’. The image of St. Paul’s is undoubtedly now the most well known of the Blitz. It suggests that even then the survival of St. Paul’s had become a symbol of defiance. The accompanying text states that the image is ‘one that all Britain will cherish – for it symbolises the steadiness of London’s stand against the enemy: the firmness of Right against Wrong’. How much was this statement reflecting public opinion and how much was it influencing it?

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Famosa fotografía de St. Paul
Photographer: Herbert Mason
29 de septiembre de 1940

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Daños alrededor de St. Paul
This map is an approximation used for demonstration purposes only. O/S maps are required for exact alignment. It is an immediate post Blitz map showing Wren’s London and its bomb damage.The circle appears to have protected St Paul’s Cathedral amazingly well!

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Clásica fotografía de Corbis.
German Bomber over London
London and the Thames lie vulnerable below a German Heinkels 111 bomber, seen from an escort plane during a bombing raid on July 9, 1940.
IMAGEN:
© CORBIS
FECHA DE LA FOTOGRAFÍA
9 de julio de 1940
LUGAR
London, England, UK
COLECCIÓN
Bettmann