Data Cracks!

Recojo aquí dos de los personajes más interesantes en la escena de la interacción y los datos.
Expertos en matemáticas, combinaciones, matrices, geometría, probabilidad, análisis numéricos, lenguaje de programación e interacción humana.
Ademas son creativos; la NASA de la visualización.

Santiago Ortiz ‘MOEBIO’

Matemáticas en la Universidad de Los Andes, Colombia.
Profesor de Arte y Tecnología en la European University de Madrid.
Visualizador, inventor de algoritmos.
Proyectos web interactivos de alta innovación.
Frameworks en Javascript/HTML5.
Fundador de Bestiario.

Moebio en Twitter.
Bestiario en Twitter.

MIKE BOSTOCK

Ciencias de la Computación, Princeton University, 2000.
Profesor en Stanford University, EEUU, Ciencias Computación.
Trabaja para TNYT desde San Francisco.
Data-Driven Documents.
Creador de librería de Javascript D3 para manipular datos en el DOM.

«D3 is a small, free JavaScript library for manipulating HTML documents based on data. D3 can help you quickly visualize your data as HTML or SVG, handle interactivity, and incorporate smooth transitions and staged animations into your pages. You can use D3 as a visualization framework (like Protovis), or you can use it to build dynamic pages (like jQuery).»

mbostock en Tumblr.

Workshop, (presentación).

mbostock en Twitter.

MAPS: Facebook y Mark Zuckerberg

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Visualización de las relaciones de amistad en Facebook.

Por Paul Butler, ingeniero de la red social.

‘Visualizing data is like photography. Instead of starting with a blank canvas, you manipulate the lens used to present the data from a certain angle.

When the data is the social graph of 500 million people, there are a lot of lenses through which you can view it. One that piqued my curiosity was the locality of friendship. I was interested in seeing how geography and political borders affected where people lived relative to their friends. I wanted a visualization that would show which cities had a lot of friendships between them.

I began by taking a sample of about ten million pairs of friends from Apache Hive, our data warehouse. I combined that data with each user’s current city and summed the number of friends between each pair of cities. Then I merged the data with the longitude and latitude of each city.

At that point, I began exploring it in R, an open-source statistics environment. As a sanity check, I plotted points at some of the latitude and longitude coordinates. To my relief, what I saw was roughly an outline of the world. Next I erased the dots and plotted lines between the points. After a few minutes of rendering, a big white blob appeared in the center of the map. Some of the outer edges of the blob vaguely resembled the continents, but it was clear that I had too much data to get interesting results just by drawing lines. I thought that making the lines semi-transparent would do the trick, but I quickly realized that my graphing environment couldn’t handle enough shades of color for it to work the way I wanted.

Instead I found a way to simulate the effect I wanted. I defined weights for each pair of cities as a function of the Euclidean distance between them and the number of friends between them. Then I plotted lines between the pairs by weight, so that pairs of cities with the most friendships between them were drawn on top of the others. I used a color ramp from black to blue to white, with each line’s color depending on its weight. I also transformed some of the lines to wrap around the image, rather than spanning more than halfway around the world.

After a few minutes of rendering, the new plot appeared, and I was a bit taken aback by what I saw. The blob had turned into a surprisingly detailed map of the world. Not only were continents visible, certain international borders were apparent as well. What really struck me, though, was knowing that the lines didn’t represent coasts or rivers or political borders, but real human relationships. Each line might represent a friendship made while travelling, a family member abroad, or an old college friend pulled away by the various forces of life.

Later I replaced the lines with great circle arcs, which are the shortest routes between two points on the Earth. Because the Earth is a sphere, these are often not straight lines on the projection.

When I shared the image with others within Facebook, it resonated with many people. It’s not just a pretty picture, it’s a reaffirmation of the impact we have in connecting people, even across oceans and borders’.

Paul is an intern on Facebook’s data infrastructure engineering team.

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Personaje del año, Time

Mark Zuckerberg
For connecting more than half a billion people and mapping the social relations among them; for creating a new system of exchanging information; and for changing how we all live our lives, Mark Elliot Zuckerberg is TIME’s 2010 Person of the Year

SOFT: Tableau 6.0, bases de datos y visualización

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Tableau 6.0
Bases de datos y visualización.

Desktop Personal Edition
999$
Tableau Desktop is a software application based on a technology breakthrough from Stanford University. It lets you graphically analyze virtually any structured data to produce beautiful charts, graphs, dashboards and reports in minutes. With Tableau’s easy to use drag-n-drop interface you’ll be quickly customizing views, layouts, shapes, colors and more to help you present your data insights.

Tableau Server is a software application that makes sharing live, interactive data visualizations, dashboards, reports and workbooks from Tableau Desktop fast and easy. With enterprise-class security and performance to support large deployments. And Tableau’s in-memory Data Engine lets you make data blazing fast on your local machine and manage the load on your mission-critical databases and cubes.

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Desktop Professional Edition
1.999$

leaders in fast analytics + visualization
It started with a goal to help people see and understand their data anywhere: spreadsheets, data marts, web files, databases, data warehouses. At Stanford, a small team led by Chris Stolte and advised by Prof. Pat Hanrahan became Tableau’s basis.
Results so far? 50,000+ people worldwide using desktop and web-based business intelligence software to produce visual analytic results like never before..

Why you’ll love Tableau ServerFast web analytics. Put live interactive analytics on the web in seconds.
Data scalability. No limit on the size of data you can work with. Work in-memory to take load off critical infrastructure or connect live to leverage fast databases.
Replace or give life to your BI platform. Replace your BI Platform completely, or run Tableau in parallel with your current system.
Easy data blending. Users can easily blend data from two databases or a database and Excel sheet without needing pre-integration work or a separate database. Free training. Live or On-Demand training online.

GRAPHICS: Visualización de datos y narración en la web, I+D total

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Interesante artículo de Garrick Schmitt en Advertising Age titulado ‘Data Visualization is Reinventing Online Storetelling’. Aquí su blog.

Enlaces interesantes:

Smashing Magazine
– Amphibia, en español
– Mashable, 16 visualizaciones
– The New York Times, Visualization Lab
– The Economist, debate
Go Visa
– Flickr clock
Sfmoma
– Oakland Crimespotting
– Radiohead, vídeo

Si esto era poco, aquí tenéis una lista de enlaces interesantes.

Y para los que estén interesados en lenguajes de programación orientado a objetos y datos:

-Actionscript, en español

-Processing, en inglés